The 4th Annual HighEdWeb Leadership Academy

The importance of web leadership can not be understated.  The success of an organization’s web efforts are directly related to the leadership skills of the web team.  In addition to traditional leadership traits, web leaders have the ability to integrate the web and digital into the fabric of the organization and align web goals and objectives with institutional goals and objects. Good leadership skills result in getting appropriate resources and having campus leadership that fully understands and supports web efforts. I am excited about our 4th annual HighEdWeb Leadership Academy that will be held on October 3-4 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin which will run in conjunction with the 2015 HighEdWeb Annual Conference. The goal of this Academy is to develop Web leaders within higher education with an intensive program that offers interactive learning experiences in a small group setting. What differentiates this leadership academy from other organizations with leadership programs is a specific focus on the job of a Web director/manager that touches all facets of the job.  This academy will offer a holistic view of what goes into being a college Web leader. Participants in the academy will learn: What is leadership, the importance of leadership for web professionals and how to develop leadership skills How to communicate effectively with campus administrators and stakeholders How to articulate the value of the web to obtain the appropriate staff and resources An understanding of higher education organization and administration, and the implications for the web How to manage people, including the ideal composition of a web team and hiring practices How to implement a Web governance structure including a Web governance...

See You in Chicago for the eduWeb Digital Summit

I’m happy to announce that I will be one of the keynote speakers at the 2015 eduWeb Digital  Summit being held in Chicago on July 27-30, 2015. I will be debuting a new talk called “The .edu Manifesto; a call to action for higher ed to get digital right.”  The web is mission critical for colleges and universities, yet most college websites remain mediocre at best, underfunded and mismanaged.  Multiple missions, silos, consensus decision making, multiple audiences with disparate needs, corporate expectations on a not-for-profit budget, campus politics, and decentralized organizational structures all combine to create a very demanding environment. But we can, and must, get digital right. My talk will be part rant, part history lesson, part hope for the future, and a call to action for higher ed to get the web and digital right.  Stay tuned to the this site over the next few weeks as I share more information about the .edu manifesto. In addition to the keynote, I will be teaching a workshop on web governance. Completely updated for 2015, this workshop will provide practical advice and guidance on using digital governance and management to achieve a sustainable, efficient, and cost effective digital presence. Topics will include: How to educate senior leadership on the importance of digital The relationship between governance, strategy, policies and standards How to create a digital governance charter that balances autonomy with accountability A review of the pros and cons of various governance models, committee structures and reporting structures How to make digital governance work in a decentralized organizational model I hope to see you in Chicago in...

Higher Education Gets Flattened at #UBtech

Next week I will be giving one of the featured talks at the UB Tech Conference in Orlando called “Higher Education Gets Flattened” and the timing couldn’t be better. I have been talking about this topic for the past 6 years but two interesting developments in recent weeks illustrate some of the fundamental changes coming to higher ed.  First was the news that students in competency-based academic programs would be eligible for federal financial aid.  This is a big deal, and will help enable a shift from “time served to stuff learned.”  Second was the announcement that Coursera is bringing online courses to 64-campus SUNY university system.  SUNY will be using Coursera as the platform for “Open SUNY” which hopes to enroll 100,000 new students in the coming years.  Consider the following quote: Coursera suggests that MOOCs could serve as for-credit courses, and SUNY — which currently enrolls nearly half of a million students — believes that one day students could earn upward of 1/3 of their credits from outside sources, such as MOOCs. IMHO, the historical importance of companies like Coursera is that they represent a move from a vertically integrated model to a horizontal model.  While the unbundling of higher education has been underway for quite some time, it has been primarily in student services such as housing and dining. Now we are seeing the unbundling of the core of the academic enterprise with companies like Coursera aggregating classes from multiple universities into a single platform.  As I talk with my colleagues who work in higher education,  many are completely unaware of the changes going on, and how...

Why the Web Matters

Next week I will be traveling to Ft. Worth to speak at the Case IV Conference.  In addition to giving a talk on web governance,  I will be opening the web track with a new presentation called Why the Web Matters (more than you  think). This is a topic I have been thinking about quite a bit lately.  Even though we now are over 20 years in, many higher ed institutions still don’t quite get the importance of the web.  College websites have become ubiquitous, and while there has been marginal improvement over the last decade, most .edu websites are still mediocre at best. Unfortunately, too many campuses take their websites for granted. There is great risk in not providing the proper time, attention, resources, and management.  As the web continues to grow in importance, this will become an even bigger issue. As more services and instruction move online, the web will become the digital manifestation of your institution. During the course of my consulting work, I speak with many senior administrators who really don’t know why the web matters.  These are all very smart, very talented, well-meaning people.  So here’s the scene.  You have the opportunity to sit down with the president of your campus to talk about the web. What would you say to convince them that the web matters? What reasoning would you use to demonstrate the web is now mission critical in higher education and requires the appropriate resources?...
265 Days Until #heweb13 (but who’s counting)

265 Days Until #heweb13 (but who’s counting)

Yes, 2013 is upon us and for me that means one thing,  the Higher Education Web Professionals Annual Conference (#heweb13) is coming to Buffalo and I have the honor and privilege of serving as conference chair.  While I have been thinking about the planning of this conference for over a year, I can’t wait to roll up my sleeves and really get down to business. For those of you not familiar with this conference, HighEdWeb is the annual conference for all higher education Web professionals—from programmers to marketers to designers to all team members in-between—who want to explore the unique Web issues facing colleges and universities.  Over 650 people attended the 2012 conference in Milwaukee and I expect the 2013 conference will be bigger and better than ever. I have spoken with many of you over the past few months who expressed interested in helping out at the conference either as a committee member or as a volunteer.  If I have not been in touch with you in the past month and you are still interested in helping out, please let me know. The call for presentations and registration will both open this spring and will be posted on the  conference website. See you in Buffalo. Stay highedweb my friends.    ...

2012: The Year of HighEdWeb Leadership

Last year my focus was on web governance. This year my attention has turned to the related topic of web leadership. There is a high correlation between the success of an organization’s web efforts and the leadership skills of the person responsible for directing their web operations.  Having great web skills and expertise is no longer enough. Having great management skills is no longer enough. To fully leverage the web, excellent leadership skills are now required. I am excited about the inaugural HighEdWed Leadership Academy that will run in conjunction with the 2012 HighEdWeb Annual Conference in Milwaukee, WI in October. The goal of this Academy is to develop Web leaders within higher education with an intensive program that offers interactive learning experiences in a small group setting. What differentiates this Leadership Academy from other organizations with leadership programs is a specific focus on the job of a Web director/manager that touches all facets of the job.  This Academy will offer a holistic view of what goes into being a college Web leader. Participants in this academy will learn: What is leadership, the importance of leadership for Web professionals, and how to develop leadership skills. How to communicate effectively with campus administrators and stakeholders. How to articulate the value of the Web to obtain the appropriate staff and resources. An understanding of higher education organization and administration, and the implications for the Web. Resource management, project prioritization, and budget. How to manage people, including the ideal composition of a Web team, hiring practices, evaluating performance, conflict resolution and mediation. How to implement a Web governance structure including a Web...